Calories Burned
in Your Sports Nutrition Plan

Sports nutrition success requires consideration of the calories burned.

  • How do I estimate calories burned while exercising?

  • The total number you burn depends on your weight, the activity and the pace. The factor for your formula is in bold type and does not change. Just insert your weight and time into the formula.
    Check out these basic calorie burning numbers based on level surfaces:

    Walking 3 miles per hour pace (20 min/mile pace).
    1.6 x your weight in pounds x 1 hour (or whatever portion of a hour*)=calories burned in that activity at that pace for that amount of time.

    Walking 4 miles per hour pace (15 min/mile pace)
    2.7 x your weight in pounds x 1 hour*

    Running 5 miles per hour pace (12 min/mile pace)
    4.1 x your weight in pounds x 1 hour*

    Running 6 miles per hour pace (10 min/mile pace)
    4.9 x your weight in pounds x 1 hour*

    Running 7 ½ mi per hour pace (8 min/mile pace)
    6.0 x your weight in pounds x 1 hour*

    Biking 6 miles per hour pace (1.5 min/mile pace)
    1.5 x your weight in pounds x 1 hour*

    Biking 10 miles per hour pace (6.0 min/mile pace)
    2.0 x your weight in pounds x 1 hour*

    Biking 15 miles per hour pace (4.0 min/mile pace)
    3.9 x your weight in pounds x 1 hour*

    Swimming resting stroke: 1.4 x your weight in pounds x 1 hour*

    Swimming 20 yds/min (moderate) 2.9 x your weight in pounds x 1 hour*

    Swimming 40 yds/min (vigorous) 4.8 x your weight in pounds x 1 hour*

    *Use .25 hours = 15 minutes; .5 hours = 30 minutes; .75 hours = 45 minutes.

    So if you’re just starting a training program and only run 1 mile, be careful! That’s not enough calories burned to celebrate with a margarita! On the other hand, you may be surprised how much fuel you did burn in a lengthy event. Celebrate with pride! Your sports nutrition plan worked!

    Click here for a more extensive list of calories burned in various activities.

  • Do the types of calories burned while I exercise differ?

  • It depends on your extent of training and the intensity of the activity. The more trained you are, the more you will burn fat fuel and rely less on the carb fuel you’ve stored. If your intensity is at a good training pace (not too fast or slow), you’ll burn more fat fuel and rely less on carb fuel. Not only is this efficient for performance, but less fat in your body is great for lifetime fitness. Bottom line, match your pace with your sports nutrition plan when considering calories burned.

  • How many calories are in a pound of fat?

  • It is estimated that one pound of fat equals 3500 calories. So, to lose one pound per week you need to reduce calories by 500 per day (less food and more calories burned). To gain one pound per week, you should add at least 500 cals per day to your diet, more calories if you’re heavily training. This is only an estimation. Track your cals eaten and cals burned and adjust up or down as needed in your sports nutrition plan.

  • Are there any foods that increase my metabolism ?

  • No. Eating adequate calories that are balanced in nutrition is important for metabolism, along with building and maintaining muscle mass through physical training. Hot peppers, for example, are fine to eat, but you can’t eat enough of them to increase calorie burning. If only it were that easy!

    Tell me more about calorie storage and sports nutrition.
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